EFSA conclude aspartame and its breakdown products are safe for human consumption at current intake levels

The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) recently re-evaluated aspartame and concluded that both it and its breakdown products are safe for human consumption at current intake levels.

Aspartame is authorised for use as a food additive (E951) in the EU where it sweetens products such as yoghurts, sweets and chewing gum. Aspartame has been authorised for use as a food additive and table-top sweetener for almost 30 years, in many countries throughout the world.

The first safety assessment of aspartame in Europe was carried out by the Scientific Committee on Food in 1984 and subsequently in 1988, 1997 and 2002. The most recent assessment was carried out by EFSA’s Panel on Food Additives and Nutrient Sources Added to Food (ANS). To carry out this re-evaluation, the ANS Panel undertook a rigorous review of all available scientific research on aspartame and its breakdown products, provided both by animal and human studies. EFSA then held an online public consultation on its draft scientific opinion on the re-evaluation of aspartame as a food additive.

EFSA concluded that aspartame and its breakdown products in the body (phenylalanine, aspartic acid and methanol) are safe for human consumption at current intake levels and that the current Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) of 40 milligrams per kilogram of body weight per day is suitable for the general population. 

Posted: 09/01/2014 12:41:53 by Laura Keaver


 

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